top of page
  • Writer's pictureThe Church for the Fellowship of All Peoples

Sunday June 23, 2024 – The 1619 Project

Updated: Jul 11

Dear Engaged Spirit Family,

 

Please join us for Engaged Spirituality on Sunday June 23 at 10:30 AM-PT, 11:30 AM-MT, 12:30 PM-CT, 1:30 PM ET as we begin our discussion of The 1619 Project created by Nikole Hannah-Jones. Please note that this is a highly researched project. There are 55 pages of documented notes at the end of the book – with 15-25 documented notes per page.

 

At this meeting we will discuss:


Note and Poem - Pages xii-xv

 

Preface by Nikole Hannah-Jones - Pages xiii-xxxiii


Note and Interlude – Pages 2-4

·       August 1619: Arrival of the White Lion with 20-30 captive Africans at Point Comfort, VA.

·       “The White Lion,” by Claudia Rankin


Chapter 1: Democracy — by Nikole Hannah-Jones – Pages 6-36

 

Notes and Interlude – Pages 38-43

·       December 1662: Virginia passes the law that stipulates that a child’s free / enslaved status depends on the status of the mother (partus sequitur ventrem), not that of the mother.

·       “Daughters of Azimuth,” by Nikky Finney - about Black enslaved women using passed-on knowledge of a toxic substance to make themselves barren to thwart the intention (reproduction of more slaves) of the rapes their owners commit.

·       1682: The first law to penalize interracial marriage, unique to the American colonies, is passed in Virginia.

·       “Loving Me” by Vievee Francis.


Chapter 2: Race — by Dorothy Roberts – Pages 44-61


Notes and Interlude – Pages 62-68

·       June 24, 1731 — Samba, an enslaved man in Louisiana, known to have led a revolt against the French in Africa before he was captured, is accused to have planned an uprising and executed, along with other alleged conspirators.

·       “Conjured” by Honorée Fanonne Jeffers is about Samba and his story.

·       May 10, 1740 — In response to the 1739 (failed) Stono Rebellion, the Negro Act is passed in South Carolina, severely restricting the “rights” of enslaved Africans, including movement, assembly, learning to read and write, earn money, etc.

·       “A Ghazalled Sentence After ‘My People Hold On’ by Eddie Kendricks and the Negro Act of 1740” by Terrance Hayes.

 

Chapter 3: Sugar, by Khalil Gibran Muhammad – Pages 70-87


Notes and Interlude – Pages 88-94

·       March 5, 1770 — Crispus Attucks, a Boston dock worker who escaped from slavery, becomes the first person who gets killed in the American Revolution against the British.

·       “First to Rise” by Yusef Komunyakaa — about the death of Crispus Attucks, ending with the story of John Adams defending the British retaliation (which I had not heard about), with a quotation of the “motley rabble of saucy boys, negroes & mulattoes, Irish teagues & outlandish jacktars.”

·       1773 — Phillis Wheatley’s Poems are published while she is still enslaved; once freed, however, the “remainder of her life is marked by poverty and illness.”

“proof [dear Phillis]” by Eve L. Ewing — a reflection written by a speaker who gets a tour in the Boston cemetery where the Mathers are buried, but not Phillis Wheatley, imagining that there were a marked grave that would remind Wheatley’s readers of her poems, the process by which she had to “prove” that she had written them to a committee, and her later life. She imagines the epitaph: Phillis Wheatley: thirty-one. Had misery enough


Chapter 4: Fear by Michelle Alexander (of The New Jim Crow) Pages 96-122

 

Notes and Interlude – Pages 124-133

·       November 7, 1775 — the Dunmore Proclamation and the promise of liberty to the enslaved by the British, resulting in a Black British regiment with about 800 soldiers.

·       “Freedom is Not for Myself Alone” by Robert Jones, Jr. — short story from the point of view of a Black man fighting in the “Dunmore regiment” even as he is very mistrustful that this white master is any better than others.

·       August 19, 1791 — letter from Black intellectual Benjamin Banneker to Thomas Jefferson a letter asking for abolition.

·       “Other Persons,” by Reginald Dwayne Betts — about Banneker’s letter and about the 3/5th compromise and euphemisms: “another word for slavery is a fraction.” It quotes from the constitution about the 3/5th rule, and several passages from Banneker’s letter.


Chapter 5: Dispossession by Tyla Miles – Pages 135-154


Notes and Interlude: Pages 156-162

·       August 30, 1800 – Gabriel’s planned rebellion of Black, Quaker, Methodist, Frenchmen, and poor white people is thwarted and he is tried, found guilty, and hanged.

·       “Trouble the Water” – Gabriel’s story

·       January 1, 1808 – The act prohibiting the importation of slaves goes into effect. Domestic slave trade increases rapidly and more and more black families are broken apart on the auction block

·       “Sold South: The story of the breaking up of Black families – the selling of fathers, mothers, children.  

 

Attached please find:

  1. (PDF and Word) Eileen - Notes for the preface of The 1619 Project for ES 06-23-2024. These are my own notes for just the Preface of the book

Eileen Notes for The 1619 Project Preface only for ES 06-23-2024
.docx
Download DOCX • 27KB
Eileen Notes for just the preface of The 1619 Project for ES 06-23-2024
.pdf
Download PDF • 130KB

2. (PDF and Word) Notes from a Blog for The 1619 Project for ES 06-23-2024 - Preface – Chapter 5. These are notes that I found online they cover from the Preface through Chapter 5

Notes from a Blog for The 1619 Project for ES 06-23-2024
.pdf
Download PDF • 177KB
Notes from a Blog for The 1619 Project for ES 06-23-2024
.docx
Download DOCX • 40KB

I hope that you can join us and share your thoughts!

 

Take care,

Eileen


Here is the ZOOM link

Meeting ID: 850 6339 5296

Passcode: 884953


One tap mobile

+16694449171,,85063395296#,,,,*884953# US

+16699006833,,85063395296#,,,,*884953# US (San Jose)

Dial by your location

• +1 669 444 9171 US

• +1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose)

• +1 408 638 0968 US (San Jose)

• +1 253 205 0468 US

• +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)

• +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)

• +1 719 359 4580 US

• +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)

• +1 305 224 1968 US

• +1 309 205 3325 US

• +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)

• +1 360 209 5623 US

• +1 386 347 5053 US

• +1 507 473 4847 US

• +1 564 217 2000 US

• +1 646 876 9923 US (New York)

• +1 646 931 3860 US

• +1 689 278 1000 US

Meeting ID: 850 6339 5296

Passcode: 884953

Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/kdwD71xWM2

2 views0 comments

Comentários


bottom of page